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NIST

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NIST SP 800-171 Compliance Guide for Colleges & Universities

‍ NIST Special Publication 800-171 (NIST SP 800-171 or NIST 800-171) is a set of security controls within the NIST Cybersecurity Framework that establishes baseline security standards for federal government organizations. NIST SP 800-171 is mandatory for all non-government organizations operating with federal information systems.

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Free NIST 800-161 Compliance Checklist

NIST SP 800-161 revision 1 outlines a cybersecurity framework for mitigating security risks in the supply chain. NIST SP-800-161 is a subset of NIST 800-53, a broader cyber risk mitigation framework that’s foundational to most cybersecurity programs. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) designed NIST 800-161 to improve cyber supply chain risk management for all U.S federal agencies.

AppSec Decoded: Addressing NIST guidelines begins with understanding your risk profile | Synopsys

In this second of two episodes of AppSec Decoded, recorded live at RSA 2022 in San Francisco, Tim Mackey, principal security strategist within the Synopsys Cybersecurity Research Center, and Taylor Armerding, security advocate at Synopsys, continue their conversation on how the guidance from NIST can help any organization.
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NIST 800-171 Compliance Checklist (Free)

NIST compliance is mandatory for any entity and service provider processing Controlled Unclassified Information (CUI) on behalf of the US Federal Government. Given the substantial risk to national security if this sensitive data is exploited and the high potential of its compromise through supply chain attacks, the range of organizations expected to comply with this cybersecurity regulation is intentionally broad.

AppSec Decoded: The NIST guidance on supply chain risk management | Synopsys

In this first of two episodes of AppSec Decoded, recorded live at RSA 2022 in San Francisco, Tim Mackey, principal security strategist within the Synopsys Cybersecurity Research Center, and Taylor Armerding, security advocate at Synopsys, discuss the overall focus of that guidance: How to build processes and programs around risk-based principles.
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Compliance Guide: NIST CSF and the Healthcare Industry

Today’s threat landscape is driven by digital transformation and the outsourcing of critical operations to third-party vendors. Cybercriminals’ high demand for sensitive data paired with a historical lack of cybersecurity investment across the industry is cause for concern. Healthcare organizations recognize they have the choice to either increase their cyber spending or inevitably fall victim to a costly data breach. However, investing in cybersecurity solutions alone isn’t enough.

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NIST updates guidance on supply chain risk

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recently updated its guidance to offer support for key practices and approaches involved in successful cyber security supply chain risk management (C-SCRM). In this blog post, we provide an overview of the update and what it means for organisations.

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What is the NIST Framework? An Introduction and a Look at Its Five Core Functions

The National Institute of Standards and Technology is an agency within the U.S. Department of Justice. It was founded in 1901 to support science and technological development. For decades, it has provided guidance on computer security. In 2014, in cooperation with public and private sector experts, the NIST released its cybersecurity framework. The framework combines best practices and industry standards to help organizations deal with cybersecurity risks.

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NIST SP 800-161r1: What You Need to Know

Modern goods and services rely on a supply chain ecosystem, which are interconnected networks of manufacturers, software developers, and other service providers. This ecosystem provides cost savings, interoperability, quick innovation, product feature diversity, and the freedom to pick between rival providers. However, due to the many sources of components and software that often form a final product, supply chains carry inherent cybersecurity risks.