Threat Hunting

CYSIAM partners with CrowdStrike to secure clients' operations

Cyber security firm CYSIAM has announced it is partnering with CrowdStrike, a leader in cloud-delivered endpoint and workload protection, to utilise the CrowdStrike Falcon Overwatch in its new Cyber Defence Operations service.
ThreatQuotient

How Effective is Threat Hunting for Organizations?

In recent years, threat hunting has become much more widely adopted, but today the definition of threat hunting is still quite a controversial topic. Threat hunting is the art of finding the unknown in your environment, going beyond traditional detection technologies, with active cyber defence activity, proactively and iteratively searching through networks to detect and isolate advanced threats that evade existing security solutions.

Introducing Siemplify ThreatFuse

ThreatFuse is an add-on module to the Siemplify SOAR platform, powered by Anomali, which ingrains threat intelligence across the entire detection and response lifecycle. From enrichment with real-time threat indicators, through threat hunting and intelligence sharing, security analysts can validate, investigate and respond to threats with unprecedented speed and precision.
tripwire

Joint Cybersecurity Advisory on Threat Hunting and Incident Response Released

A joint cybersecurity advisory released on September 1st detailed technical methods for uncovering and responding to malicious activity including best practice mitigations and common missteps. A collaborative effort, this advisory (coded AA20-245A) is the product of research from the cybersecurity organizations of five nations.

Intelligence Driven Threat Hunting with SOAR

Most security teams face the same challenges when it comes to their ability to be proactive: skills shortages, lack of visibility into weaknesses and the incapacity of internal resources to detect and eliminate threats. Cyberint’s new solution uncovers existing compromises, malicious activity, persistence, and residuals from past breaches with an intelligence-driven approach to hunt down threats. When managed threat hunting is combined with the power of security orchestration, automation and response (SOAR), organizations can obtain critical context about attacks in real-time, streamlining the response process. How managed threat hunting helps businesses be proactive about their security. Why it’s critical to onboard managed threat hunting service at a time when global challenges like COVID-19 create business disruption and change organizations’ digital environments for months or years to come The types of threats that can be discovered during a threat hunt – from active attacks to the remnants of past intrusions. How leveraging SOAR technology can help automate hunts and better manage security incidents, from identification to remediation, through custom playbooks. Presented By Adi Perez - VP Technology, CyberInt Nimmy Reichenberg - Cheif Marketing Officer, Siemplify

Creating a Scalable and Repeatable Threat Hunting Program with Carbon Black and Siemplify

According to SANS, 82% of all SOCs are investing in advanced Threat Hunting programs, but that is no simple task. Many organizations struggle with incorporating threat hunting into their security operations efforts due to a lack of expertise. Creating an effective threat hunting program requires a combination of the right tools and the right processes. The combination of flexibility and automation opens up the ability for anyone in the security operations center to perform threat hunting at scale.
alienvault

Threat hunting explained

The process of threat hunting involves proactively searching for malware or attackers that are hiding within a network. Rather than simply relying on security solutions or services to detect threats, threat hunting is a predictive element to a layered security strategy, empowering organizations to go on the offensive looking for threats.

veriato

What is the Next Generation Threat Hunting

The FBI recently reported that in 2019, cybercrime cost businesses $3.5 billion, a number they say is likely grossly underestimated. Another study from Accenture that spanned 11 countries across 16 industries found that the complexity of attacks is also increasing. As a result, the average cost of cybercrime for an organization grew from $1.4 million to $13.0 million.